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Free Radical Therapy Blog » allergen

Posts Tagged ‘allergen’

Managing Eosinophilia

Thursday, September 30th, 2010

How Delivering Free Radical Therapy According to the Designed2Win Health Model Provided a Positive Outcome

Every now and then a FRT health provider may run into a client who presents a confusing situation that hadn’t been solved with meds, and really can’t get solved through FRT without returning to its health model basis. An example is a recent client who demonstrated an eosinophilic white blood count of more than 20%. Less than 4% is normal, so 20% is not healthy, especially when allowed to remain that high, as the amount of toxins released by eosinophils aimed at killing parasites but which can be stimulated by any allergen are certain to damage healthy tissues. Such a scenario affecting the lungs can cause severe compromise in lung function, leading to COPD, asthma or a tumor.

In this scenario the culprit is generally some allergen that has stimulated both the mast cells and the basophilic white blood cells to release histamine. The histamine helps stimulate bone marrow to produce more eosinophils, and the cycle continues until something is done to either blunt the effect of histamine or blunt the flood of histamine-like molecules that anti-histamine meds generally fail to touch. So, what do you do?

Addressing the role of acid stress is always the place to begin, since acidity is certain to amplify the release of histamine due to the mast cell and basophilic response to the allergen. Acidity follows the presence and action of any toxin, including that of a parasite. Thus a more alkaline environment tends to require fewer histamine-like particles. The eosinophil count falls accordingly.

How else you might go about reducing the amount of histamine – and thereby the eosinophil count – can be deduced by reviewing the key source of histamine. It is made from the amino acid histidine. Knowing this you might be tempted to restrict foods that are rich sources of histidine. The problem with this strategy is that histidine also provides the imidazole ring that is so important in buffering the acids all over the body. So, any restriction of the key amino acid can be self-defeating.

The Designed2Win attitude is needed to solve this problem. During exercise, the body releases the amino acid alanine, which serves to stimulate the making of HDL cholesterol while also serving as the substrate for the synthesis of carnosine. Carnosine is used to sponge away the lactic acid produced during exercise, thereby slowing fatigue. Too, the more alanine present at any given moment, the more the body will be prompted to use histidine for the making of carnosine at the expense of making histamine.

Based on this reality, the following suggestion was made to the health provider who was caring for the person in question: Follow the acid/base balancing maneuver with one that diverts histidine away from the making of histamine and towards the making of carnosine. By administering 3 grams L-alanine (not beta alanine) twice daily for a week (for a 150 lb person), followed by once daily for two weeks, the clinician noted a drop in the total eosinophil count from 20% to 6% within 3 weeks. This became far more manageable and less threatening to the person’s health.

Now, of course, you wouldn’t recommend this protocol to everyone you see. Histidine has a life beyond the making of either carnosine or histamine. So easing up on the high supplementation at some point will be essential in order to comply with the body’s winning design.